Wildflowers of the United States

Home Journal Family Index - All States Photo Albums News About Privacy

Purple Passionflower, Maypop - Passiflora incarnata


Family: Passifloraceae Passion-flower family Genus Common Name: Passion Flower Native Status: Native
Passiflora incarnata - Purple Passionflower, Maypop. According to unconfirmed information on Wikipedia, the Cherokees called this Ocoee and therefore the Ocoee River is named after this plant, which is the Tennessee State wildflower. Walker County, Ga - June 23, 2009

Journal Articles Referencing Passion Flower

Leave comments on Passiflora incarnata at this link.

Distribution of Passiflora incarnata in the United States and Canada:
USDA Plants Distribution Map temporarily unavailable.
Blue=Native; Grey=Introduced

Map from USDA Plants Database:
USDA, NRCS. 2009. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov, 18 Apr 2014). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

Search Our Database of Species
Enter any portion of the Scientific
or Common Name (or both)

Scientific name:
Common name:

Example: Enter "lob" in the common name field and you'll get all our species that have "lobelia" in the common name, as well as "sharp-lobed hepatica".

Do a general Google search of the entire site:




Follow on Twitter
Follow USWildflowers on Twitter










Site: Walker County, Ga Date: 2009-June-23Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Purple Passion Flower plant showing blossom and trident-shaped leaf: deeply palmate with three lobes.
Passiflora incarnata

Site: Walker County, Ga Date: 2009-June-23Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
aka Maypop. According to unconfirmed information on Wikipedia, the Cherokees called this Ocoee and therefore the Ocoee River is named after this plant, which is the Tennessee State wildflower. Walker County, Ga - June 23, 2009
Passiflora incarnata

Site: Walker County, Ga Date: 2009-June-23Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Stamens and anthers make for an interesting superstructure above the blossom. According to 16th-century Spanish missionaries, the stigmata represented the three nails with which Christ was fastened to the cross, and the 5 anthers represent the 5 wounds he received in his flesh at the crucifixion.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Passiflora incarnata

Site: Walker County, Ga Date: 2009-June-29Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Five petals and five sepals. The sepals in Passiflora incarnata are green underneath and white on top. The petals are white.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Passiflora incarnata

Site: Walker County, Ga Date: 2009-June-29Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Passiflora incarnata leaves are palmate, deeply lobed with three lobes. The shape of a lobe was used by early Spanish missionaries to indicate the shape of the spear-tip which pierced Christ's side at the crucifixion, the Passion of Christ, from which the Passionflower gets its name.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Passiflora incarnata

Site: Walker County, Ga Date: 2009-June-29Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Fruit of Passiflora incarnata beginning to form; I believe it to be this fruit that gives Passionflower the alternate common name of Maypop.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Passiflora incarnata

Site: Robertson County, TN Date: 2009-October-21Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Passionfruit from Passiflora incarnata is edible. When properly ripe, the seeds are encompassed in a slimy membranes which has a tart-sweet taste. It can be a bit of work to get the tasty slime off of the crunchy seeds, but worth a try at least once. The fruit is ripe when it is slightly softened.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Passiflora incarnata

Site: Reflection Riding, Hamilton County, TN Date: 2010-August-28Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D60
Click on the photo for a larger image
Passiflora incarnata

Site: Walker County, Ga Date: 2009-June-29Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Passionflower tendril the vine uses to climb on other plants
Click on the photo for a larger image
Passiflora incarnata

Site: Walker County, Ga Date: 2009-June-29Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) vine climbing a ditch bank.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Passiflora incarnata

References used for identification and information:

Looking for Wildflowers for a specific state? Check here:



All content except USDA Plants Database map Copyright Gerald C. Williamson 2014
Photographs Copyrighted by the named photographer