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Bluebell Bellflower, Bluebell, Harebell, Bluebell-of-Scotland, Blue Rain Flower, Heathbells, Witches Thimbles - Campanula rotundifolia


Family: Campanulaceae - Bellflower family Genus Common Name: Bellflower Native Status: Native
Campanula rotundifolia - Bluebell Bellflower, Bluebell, Harebell, Bluebell-of-Scotland, Blue Rain Flower, Heathbells, Witches Thimbles. Campanula rotundifolia is a circumboreal species around the world in the northern hemisphere, and is thus found throughout much of northern North America, including Canada and the northern states in the United States from coast to coast. It is also found in the higher elevations in the Rockies (up to 12,000 feet) and Appalachians, so is completely absent only from a few midwestern states, Nevada (too dry), and the deep southeastern states. It is also found in the northern parts of Asia and Europe - it is well-known in Scotland. It grows in a variety of habitats, from dry meadows to moist beaches; the one photographed here on a rocky shore of a cove in Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada.

Found in:
AK, AZ, CA, CO, CT, IA, ID, IL, IN, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OR, PA, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY

Distribution of Campanula rotundifolia in the United States and Canada:
USDA Plants Distribution Map temporarily unavailable.
Blue=Native; Grey=Introduced

Map from USDA Plants Database:
USDA, NRCS. 2009. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov, 20 Jan 2017). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

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Site: Baie Fine of Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada Date: 2015-August-13Photographer: Gerald C. Williamson
Nikon D7000
Tamron SP 90MM f/2.8 AF Macro
Bluebell Bellflower carries its blossoms at the end of the stem either singly or in a loose raceme of a few flowers. Each flower is on a relatively long pedicel of up to nearly 2 inches long, and the corolla itself is nearly an inch long. The flower is a beautiful blue or lavender, or may rarely be white.
Campanula rotundifolia

Site: Baie Fine of Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada Date: 2015-August-13Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D7000
Campanula rotundifolia has 5 stamens deep within the bell-shaped corolla, and a 3-lobed stigma.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Campanula rotundifolia

Site: Baie Fine of Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada Date: 2015-August-13Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D7000
Bluebell Bellflower blooms in the summer and fall. The calyx lobes are linear. I have read reports that the corolla lobes are reflexed, although in my limited experience they seem to be minimally so if at all, unlike those of Southern Harebell - Campanula divaricata
Click on the photo for a larger image
Campanula rotundifolia

Site: Rocky Mountain National Park, Larimer County, CO Date: 2016-August-26Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D7000
In the Rocky Mountains, Campanula rotundifolia can be easily mistaken for Campanula parreyi. The shape of the basal leaves are different, but those of C. rotundifolia will be withered by bloom time. The linear sepals of C. parryi will reach the cleft in the corolla lobes, while those of C. rotundifolia are much shorter.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Campanula rotundifolia

Site: Baie Fine of Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada Date: 2015-August-13Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D7000
Campanula rotundifolia grows to about 15 inches high. It has a weak stem, although not as weak as some of the sprawling members of the genus, causing it to frequently lean over notably when bearing the weight of its blossoms, although it will be more frequently erect. The stem is terete - rounded, or nearly so, and may or may not branch. The stem leaves are linear. The basal leaves, which usually wither by flowering, are rounded, yielding the species epithet.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Campanula rotundifolia

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All content except USDA Plants Database map Copyright Gerald C. Williamson 2017
Photographs Copyrighted by the named photographer