Wildflowers of the United States

Home Journal Family Index - All States Photo Albums News About Privacy

Virginia Dayflower - Commelina virginica


Family: Commelinaceae - Spiderwort family Genus Common Name: Dayflower Native Status: NativeMonocot Perennial Herb
Commelina virginica - Virginia Dayflower. Commelina virginica grows in wet places, especially along swamps, rivers, and where this was photographed, along stream banks. It flowers from mid-summer and on into fall, growing in the southeastern quadrant of the United States as far west as Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas, and as far north as Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. It was historically present in Pennsylvania, but it is reported as being extirpated in that state.

Found in:
AL, AR, DC, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, NJ, OH, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV

Leave comments on Commelina virginica at this link.
Commelina virginica

Distribution of Commelina virginica in the United States and Canada:
USDA Plants Distribution Map temporarily unavailable.
Blue=Native; Grey=Introduced

Map from USDA Plants Database:
USDA, NRCS. 2017. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov, 13 Dec 2017). National Plant Data Team, Greensboro, NC 27401-4901 USA.

Search Our Database: Enter any portion of the Scientific, Common Name, or both.
Scientific name:
Common name:

Example: Enter "lob" in the common name field and you'll get all our species that have "lobelia" in the common name, as well as "sharp-lobed hepatica".

Do a general Google search of the entire site:



Follow on Twitter
Follow USWildflowers on Twitter




Site: Walker County, GA Date: 2012-September-26Photographer: Gerald C. Williamson
Nikon D7000
Tamron SP 90MM f/2.8 AF Macro
Virginia Dayflower has 3 light blue petals. The third petal is somewhat smaller than the top two petals. Some other Commelina species have darker blue petals, with the third petal being white and notably smaller than the top two. The spathe in Commelina virginica is fused for about a third; that of some other species are fully open. This is a noteworthy attribute for identifying Commelina species.
Commelina virginica

Site: Walker County, GA Date: 2012-September-26Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D7000
While looking from the top the leaves may appear to be in a whorl, they are actually spirally arranged. The mud on this plant demonstrates the wet environment in which the plant grows - this plant being in an area frequently flooded after a rain.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Commelina virginica

Site: Walker County, GA Date: 2012-September-26Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D7000
The leaves are arranged in a spiral, with the sheaths having red hairs on the edges. The plant grows up to about 3 feet high, although in my experience it is usually found to be much shorter.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Commelina virginica

Site: Walker County, GA Date: 2012-September-26Photographer: Gerald C Williamson
Nikon D7000
Tamron SP 90MM f/2.8 AF Macro
The flowers emerge from spathes which are clustered terminally. They are normally glabrous - without hairs - but may occasionally be covered with soft short hairs.
Click on the photo for a larger image
Commelina virginica

References used for identification and information:

Commercial / Cookie Notice

Looking for Wildflowers for a specific state? Check here:



All content except USDA Plants Database map Copyright Gerald C. Williamson 2017
Photographs Copyright owned by the named photographer